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Protocol Information

John M. Englert
Natural Resources Conservation Service - Norman A. Berg National Plant Materials Center
Bldg. 509, BARC - East, E. Beaver Dam Road
Beltsville, Maryland 20705
(301) 504-8175
(301) 504-8741
john.englert@wdc.usda.gov
http://plant-materials.nrcs.usda.gov/mdpmc/


Family Scientific Name: Anacardiaceae
Family Common Name: Cashew Family
Scientific Name: Toxicodendron vernix
Common Name: Poison Sumac
Species Code: TOXVER
Ecotype: National Capital Parks-East, Washington, D.C., Oxon Run Parkway
General Distribution: Southern Maine and southwest Nova Scotia to Minnesota, Ohio, and Indiana, south to Florida and Texas. Found in swamps, usually in shade.
Propagation Goal: Plants
Propagation Method: Seed
Product Type: Container (plug)
Stock Type: 1 gallon container
Time To Grow: 1 Weeks
Target Specifications: Stock Type: 1/2 gallon-1 gallon container plants.
Height: 36 inches.
Root System: Plants have firm root ball when pulled from container.
Propagule Collection: Collected in National Capital Parks-East, Washington, D.C., Oxon Run Parkway by J. Kujawski 8/26/97.
Propagule Processing: Seed Processing: WEAR LATEX GLOVES AT ALL TIMES WHEN HANDLING SEEDS AND LONG SLEEVES WHEN WORKING WITH PLANTS. Seeds are rubbed over a wire screen or wire handheld kitchen strainer to remove outer covering.
Seeds/Kg: approximately 75,000.
Germination: 3%.
Purity: 80%.
Pre-Planting Treatments: Seed Treatments: Seeds are not given a stratification or scarification (resulting in 3% germination), and may benefit from such a treatment. Seeds are similar to Rhus spp. seeds, which have markedly greater germination after acid scarification.
Growing Area Preparation/
Annual Practices for Perennial Crops:

Propagation Environment: greenhouse with alternating day/night temperatures.
Seed Propagation Method: Seed is hand sown on open flat of Sunshine Mix #1.
Establishment Phase: Sowing Date: March.
Emergence and Date: N/A.
Sowing/Planting Technique: Seeds are liberally hand sown on open flats, placed on a greenhouse bench, and watered by hand as necessary.
Establishment Phase: N/A.
Active Growth Phase: Rapid Growth Phase: N/A.
Hardening Phase: Hardening Phase: Plants started in the greenhouse are transplanted into quarts and moved outside to a shade house in summer. Container plants remain in the shade house until they are taken for planting at the park.
Harvesting, Storage and Shipping: Total Time to Harvest: Plants reach gallon size two seasons after germination.
Storage Conditions: Container plants smaller than 1 gallon are stored in a cold house @ 40 F for the winter; containers are periodically watered to prevent dehydration. Gallon size and larger containers are stored outside. Containers are laid on their side in a block on weed barrier fabric, and covered with 2 layers of a microfoam insulating blanket. The blanket is secured over plants by threading a rope over the blanket between rebar anchors on either side of the block of plants.
Length of Storage: Storage Duration: December to mid-March.
Other Comments: Vegetation Propagation Method: N/A.
References: Kujawski, J. 1997 Annual Report to the National Park Service for National Capital Parks-East Oxon Run Parkway. USDA NRCS National Plant Materials Center, Beltsville, MD.

Kujawski, J. 1998 Annual Report to the National Park Service for National Capital Parks-East Oxon Run Parkway. USDA NRCS National Plant Materials Center, Beltsville, MD.

Gleason and Cronquist. 1991. Manual of Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada, 2nd edition. New York Botanical Garden.

Citation:
Davis, Kathy M.; Kujawski, Jennifer L. 2001. Propagation protocol for production of container Toxicodendron vernix plants (1 gallon container); Natural Resources Conservation Service - Norman A. Berg National Plant Materials Center, Beltsville, Maryland. In: Native Plant Network. URL: http://www.nativeplantnetwork.org (accessed 20 April 2014). Moscow (ID): University of Idaho, College of Natural Resources, Forest Research Nursery.