Untitled Page
About Us
Journal
Propagation Protocol Database
Links
Subscribe to Native Plant Journal
Print View

Protocol Information

John M. Englert
Natural Resources Conservation Service - Norman A. Berg National Plant Materials Center
Bldg. 509, BARC - East, E. Beaver Dam Road
Beltsville, Maryland 20705
(301) 504-8175
(301) 504-8741
john.englert@wdc.usda.gov
http://plant-materials.nrcs.usda.gov/mdpmc/


Family Scientific Name: Juncaceae
Family Common Name: Rush Family
Scientific Name: Juncus tenuis
Common Name: Path rush
Species Code: JUNTEN
Ecotype: Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Shenandoah National Park
General Distribution: Throughout most of North America and naturalized elsewhere. Found in wet to dry soils, compacted soil, and especially along woodland paths.
Propagation Goal: Plants
Propagation Method: Seed
Product Type: Container (plug)
Target Specifications: Stock Type: Container plug.
Height: About 2-3”.
Root System: Full, firm plug.
Propagule Collection: Collected in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, mile 0.5 beginning DRUC trail by J. Englert on 7/27/93 and 8/19/93; in Shenandoah National Park, Gregory’s Bald by A. Johnson, T. Rumaley, D. Raxter and D. Gibbs on 9/6/94.
Propagule Processing: Seed Processing: Seed is harvested with a sickle bar from early August through mid September at the National Plant Materials Center. Seed is cleaned first with a debearder, then large clipper, screens 1 and 9, no air, belt off; small clipper, screens 1/25 and solid air, low; vents 1/4 open.
Seeds/Kg: Undetermined; seed is very small.
Germination: Untested, however production rate is between 4,000 and 5,000 plugs per gram of seed.
Purity: Undetermined.
Pre-Planting Treatments: Seed Treatments: None.
Growing Area Preparation/
Annual Practices for Perennial Crops:

Propagation Environment: Greenhouse with alternating day/night temperatures. No supplemental light.
Propagation Method: Hand sown.
Container Type and Volume: Seed is direct-sown onto media in 72 plug trays or Ropak multipots.
Growing Media: Sunshine #1 potting mix plus 180 day 18-6-8 Nutricote SR with micronutrients added at 20 oz. per 3.8 cu. ft. bale of mix (0.15 lb./cu. ft.). Containers cells are filled 3/4" full with potting mix and topped off with germination mix (about 1/2").
Establishment Phase: Sowing Date: January for spring outplanting; Mid June-July for fall.
% Emergence and Date: 1995 seed took up to 105 days to germinate in 1997; 1998 seed took 8-10 days to germinate in 1999. Germination is usually so thick in each cell that percent of seed germinated is not estimated. In 1999, 0.6 grams of seed produced 1500 finished plugs, most of which had many Juncus seedlings. In 1998, 0.45 g. of seed produced 2400 plugs after division, most of which were multiples.
Sowing/Planting Technique: Seed is mixed with talc and surface-sown on top of above media. Trays are placed under mist until seed has germinated (8-10 days).
Establishment Phase: No special needs except periodic light fertilization with soluble fertilizer as needed. Maintain moisture in cells especially if seedlings are densely planted.
Active Growth Phase: Rapid Growth Phase: Plugs that were sown in July 1997, then divided and overwintered in the greenhouse went off color during February in spite of fertilization but greened up about a month later. Juncus is slow to put on height.
Hardening Phase: Hardening phase: Plugs are hardened off outdoors, weather permitting, 2 weeks prior to outplanting.
Harvesting, Storage and Shipping: Total Time to Harvest: 13 weeks from germination to finished plug in spring, 1999.
Storage Conditions: Plugs are not routinely overwintered.
Seed storage:In seed bags in National Plant Materials Center cooler at 40ºF 35% relative humidity. Seed may lose viability very quickly, in a matter of 2-3 years.
Seed dormancy: None.
Outplanting performance on typical sites: Outplanting Date: Fall or spring for field planting at National Plant Materials Center, Spring in the Parks.
Other Comments: Vegetation Propagation Method: Plugs are easily divided to increase numbers. In 1998, about 800 plugs from 2(406) trays were divided to produce 2,400 finished plugs.
Propagators: H. Hayward, K. Davis, B. King.
References: Gleason, H. A. and A. Cronquist. 1991. Manual of Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada, 2nd edition. New York Botanical Garden.

Citation:
Kujawski, Jennifer; Davis, Kathy M. 2001. Propagation protocol for production of container Juncus tenuis plants; Natural Resources Conservation Service - Norman A. Berg National Plant Materials Center, Beltsville, Maryland. In: Native Plant Network. URL: http://www.nativeplantnetwork.org (accessed 17 September 2014). Moscow (ID): University of Idaho, College of Natural Resources, Forest Research Nursery.